Grade
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Conheça as matérias que serão estudas nos 2 primeiros anos.

COMMON CORE TRACK

Introduction to Anthropology

ANT2000 Introduction to Anthropology
Credit Hours: 3

An introductory study of the biological evolution and cultural development of human customs, social organization, and institutions. The student is introduced to the major fields of study undertaken by anthropologists. This is a writing credit course with international/intercultural content. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

Course Outline

Art Appreciation

ARH2000 Art Appreciation
Credit Hours: 3

Art Appreciation is a course for non-art majors that introduces a chronological history of art including style, form, media, and meaning. This is a writing credit course with international/Intercultural content. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

Course Outline

General Chemistry I

CHM1045 General Chemistry 1
Credit Hours: 3

This is the first course in a two semester sequence, CHM 1045 and CHM 1046. This sequence includes two laboratories: CHM 1045L to be taken concurrently with CHM 1045 and CHM 1046L to be taken with CHM 1046. This sequence is for students who have already had high school chemistry. Topics covered include: chemical measurements, stoichiometry, atomic structure periodic table, chemical bonding, inorganic compounds, nomenclature, formula writing, gases, liquids, solids, solutions acid-base chemistry and ionic reactions and some descriptive chemistry of non-metals. To enroll, it is strongly recommended that students have had previous chemistry at the high school or college level. If a student has not had prior experience in a chemistry course the CHM 1040/CHM 1041/CHM 1046 sequence is highly recommended.

Course Outline

General Chemistry I Lab

CHM1045L General Chemistry I Laboratory
Credit Hours: 1

Laboratory experiments to accompany CHM1041 or CHM1045.

Course Outline

Composition I

ENC1101 Composition I
Credit Hours: 3

ENC1101 is a university parallel course that requires students to learn and practice writing by creating original compositions, exploring basic rhetorical forms such as narration, exposition, and argumentations. Students will also develop research skills and learn to incorporate research material through the writing process. For non-exempt students, placement in ENC1101 is determined by both standard and departmental assessment tests. Students must earn a grade of C or higher to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing. This is a writing credit course that focuses on extensive writing and revision.

Course Outline

Composition II

ENC1102 Composition II
Credit Hours: 3

Composition II is designed to further develop a student’s communication skills by building on the writing and critical thinking strategies learned in ENC1101. The course requires students to observe the conventions of Standard American English and create documented essays, demonstrating a students’ ability to think critically and communicate analytically. Selected texts supple-ment the course and provide topics for discussion and assignments. Students use library research methods for primary and secondary sources to produce MLA style-documented and well-argued research essays and projects. This is a writing credit course. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

Course Outline

Environmental Science

EVR1001 Introduction to Environmental Science
Credit Hours: 3

Study of the physical environment, its relationship with the biosphere, and man’s impact upon natural systems. This course includes ecological systems, Florida environments and geology, pollution and environmental regulations, renewable and nonrenewable resources, and sustainability. This course meets General Education requirements in the Biological and Physical Sciences. Placement by Testing Department.

Course Outline

Introduction to International Relations

INR 2002 Introduction to International Relations
Credit Hours: 3

College Algebra

MAC1105 College Algebra
Credit Hours: 3

A college algebra course containing topics such as solving, graphing and applying linear and quadratic equations and inequalities; exponential and logarithmic properties; linear, quadratic, rational, absolute value, square root, cubic, and reciprocal functions operations, compositions, and inverses of functions; and systems of equations and inequalities, all with applications throughout the course. Recommendation from the Mathematics Department or at least a grade of a “C” in the prerequisite coursework is required.

Pre-Calculus Algebra

MAC1140 Pre-Calculus Algebra
Credit Hours: 3

This course, in conjunction with MAC1114, is designed to prepare the student for the study of calculus. Topics include sequences, series, mathematical induction, matrices, determinants, and systems of equations. Also included are polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions and equations; and polynomial and rational inequalities. Functions and graphs are emphasised. A graphing calculator may be required. Recommendation from the Mathematics Department or at least a grade of a “C” in the prerequisite coursework is required.

Introductory Logic

PHI1100 Introductory Logic
Credit Hours: 3

Study of the principles and evaluation of critical thinking including identification and analysis of fallacious, as well as valid reasoning. Traditional and symbolic logic will be considered and foundations will be laid for further study in each area. This is a writing credit course. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

Course Outline

Introduction to Public Speaking

SPC1608 Introduction to Public Speaking
Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to provide students with fundamental training and practical experience for speaking in public, business, and professional situations. Topics include: audience analysis, speech anxiety, critical listening, and preparation and delivery of speeches in various cultural contexts. Students will also learn to effectively incorporate audio and visual aids/technologies for ef-fective speeches. This is an International/Intercultural competency course.

Course Outline

Total Wellness

HLP1081 Total Wellness
Credit Hours: 2

Total Wellness emphasizes the importance of knowledge, attitudes, and practices relating to personal wellness. It is a course designed to expose students to a broad range of issues and infor-mation relating to the various aspects of personal wellness including physical, social emotional, intellectual, spiritual and environmental wellness. This course integrates personal wellness and fitness in both a classroom and exercise environment. Evolving current topics such as nutrition, disease prevention, stress reduction, exercise prescription, and environmental responsibility are integrated to enable the student to understand the lifelong effects of healthy lifestyle choices. This is an International/Intercultural competency course.

Strategies for Success

SLS1001 Strategies for Success
Credit Hours: 3

This course is tailored for First Time in College students and provides opportunities to: learn about Broward College and higher education; acquire and practice learning strategies; explore personal learning styles; identify career options; and develop lifelong skills for responsible citizenship.

BIOLOGICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES TRACK

Introduction to Biology I

BSC2010 Introduction to Biology I
Credit Hours: 3

This course is the first of a two-semester sequence introducing science majors to biological principles including cell structure, function, communication, reproduction, biochemistry and metabolism, classical and molecular genetics, and genetic engineering. Upon successful completion of this course, the students will be able to explain the methods of science, describe the characteristics of life, describe structure, function, and communication of cells, distinguish mitosis and mei-sis, describe cell energetics, photosynthesis and respiration, solve genetics problems, and describe major advances in genetic engineering.

Introduction to Biology I Laboratory

BSC2010L Introduction to Biology I Laboratory
Credit Hours: 1

This laboratory course is the first of a two-course sequence introducing science majors to biological principles including cell structure and function, cell reproduction, biochemistry and cell metabolism, classical and molecular genetics, and genetic engineering. Three hours laboratory per week.

Introduction to Biology II

BSC2011 Introduction to Biology II
Credit Hours: 3

This course is the second of a two-course sequence introducing science majors to biological principles including a study of the diversity of organisms, evolution and population dynamics, and ecology.

Introduction to Biology II Laboratory

BSC2011L Introduction to Biology II Laboratory
Credit Hours: 11

This course is the second of a two-course sequence introducing science majors to biological principles including a study of the diversity of organisms, evolution and population dynamics, and ecology. Dissection exercises included.

General Chemistry II

CHM1046 General Chemistry II
Credit Hours: 3

This is the final course of the two-semester general chemistry sequence: CHM1045 and CHM1046. These sequences include two laboratories: (1) CHM1045L to be taken concurrently with CHM1045, and (2) CHM1046L to be taken with CHM1046. Topics covered include thermo-dynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, electrochemistry, coordination chemistry, descriptive chemistry of metals, nuclear chemistry and an introduction to organic chemistry.

General Chemistry II Laboratory

CHM1046L General Chemistry II Laboratory
Credit Hours: 1

Laboratory experiments to accompany CHM1046E or CHM1046. Special fee charged. Upon successful completion of this course, the students should be able to use appropriate laboratory equipment to safely perform laboratory experiments that relate to the topics covered in CHM1046, to collect data accurately and to use those data to calculate a reasonable answer or come to a logical conclusion.

Trigonometry

MAC1114 Trigonometry
Credit Hours: 3

This course, in conjunction with MAC1140, is designed to prepare the student for the study of calculus. Topics include a functional approach to trigonometry, trigonometric equations, trigonometric identities, solving triangles, vectors, polar coordinates and equations, and parametric equa-tions. A graphing calculator may be required. Recommendation from the Mathematics Department or at least a grade of a “C” in the prerequisite coursework is required.

Calculus and Analytical Geometry I

MAC2311 Calculus & Analytical Geometry I
Credit Hours: 5

This is the first of a three-course sequence in calculus. Students may need to a graphing calculator throughout the sequence of courses. Topics include: analytic geometry, functions, limits, continuity, derivatives and their applications, transcendental functions, anti-derivatives, and definite integrals. Certain sections of this course may require the use of a graphing calculator. Recommendation from the Mathematics Department or at least a grade of a “C” in the prerequisite coursework required.

General Physics with Calculus I

PHY2048 General Physics with Calculus I
Credit Hours: 4

PHY2048 is part one of a comprehensive course in physics outlining mechanics, heat, and wave motion using analysis in calculus.

General Physics with Calculus I Laboratory

PHY2048L General Physics with Calculus I Laboratory
Credit Hours: 1

PHY2048L is a laboratory which allows students to able to collect and analyze data in a variety of experiments covering topics covered in its companion course PHY2048. Students will create experiment reports using analysis in calculus.

General Physics with Calculus II

PHY2049 General Physics with Calculus II
Credit Hours: 4

PHY2049 is part two of a comprehensive physics course outlining electricity, magnetism and optics using analysis in calculus.

General Physics with Calculus II Laboratory

PHY2049L General Physics with Calculus II Laboratory
Credit Hours: 1

A series of physics laboratory experiments chosen to coincide with the lecture course PHY2049. The course will include topics in electricity, magnetism, and optics. One 2-hour class meeting per week. A laboratory fee is charged.

ENGINEERING AND MATHEMATICS TRACK

Introduction to C++

COP1334C Introduction to C++
Credit Hours: 3

This course provides an introduction to computer program design and development using the C++ language. A structured, multiphase, program development process featuring a series of steps involving problem definition, top-down design, and formal program specification is stressed. The course is intended to provide the novice programming student with the techniques needed to develop well documented, structured computer programs.

Introduction to Engineering

EGS1001 Introduction to Engineering
Credit Hours: 3

This course is a basic introduction to engineering. It will explore the various engineering fields, engineering problem solving, and basic math and physics used by engineers. Other topics such as safety, ethics, and engineering communications will also be addressed.

Trigonometry

MAC1114 Trigonometry
Credit Hours: 3

This course, in conjunction with MAC1140, is designed to prepare the student for the study of calculus. Topics include a functional approach to trigonometry, trigonometric equations, trigonometric identities, solving triangles, vectors, polar coordinates and equations, and parametric equations. A graphing calculator may be required. Recommendation from the Mathematics Department or at least a grade of a “C” in the prerequisite coursework is required.

Calculus and Analytical Geometry I

MAC2311 Calculus & Analytical Geometry I
Credit Hours: 5

This is the first of a three-course sequence in calculus. Students may need to a graphing calculator throughout the sequence of courses. Topics include: analytic geometry, functions, limits, continuity, derivatives and their applications, transcendental functions, anti-derivatives, and definite integrals. Certain sections of this course may require the use of a graphing calculator. Recommendation from the Mathematics Department or at least a grade of a “C” in the prerequisite coursework required.

Calculus and Analytical Geometry II

MAC2312 Calculus & Analytical Geometry II
Credit Hours: 5

This is the second of a three-course sequence in calculus. Topics include techniques of integr-tion, conics, polar coordinates, indeterminate forms, L’Hopital’s Rule, proper integrals, infinite series, parametric equations, improper integrals, volume, arc length, surface area, work, and other applications of integration. A graphing calculator may be required in certain sections of this course. Recommendation from the Mathematics Department or at least a grade of a “C” in the pre-requisite coursework required.

Calculus and Analytical Geometry III

MAC2313 Calculus & Analytical Geometry III
Credit Hours: 5

This is the third of a three-course sequence in calculus. Topics include vectors in 3 space, 3 dimensional surfaces, multivariate functions, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, multiple integrals, partial derivatives, vector fields, a graphing calculator may be required in certain sections of this course. Recommendation from the Mathematics Department or at least a grade of a “C” in the pre-requisite coursework required.

Differential Equations

MAP2302 Differential Equations
Credit Hours: 3

Topics include the classification, solution and application of differential equations, including numerical methods, Laplace transforms, linear systems, and series solutions.

General Physics with Calculus I

PHY2048 General Physics with Calculus I
Credit Hours: 4

PHY2048 is part one of a comprehensive course in physics outlining mechanics, heat, and wave motion using analysis in calculus.

General Physics with Calculus I Laboratory

PHY2048L General Physics with Calculus I Laboratory
Credit Hours: 1

PHY2048L is a laboratory which allows students to able to collect and analyze data in a variety of experiments covering topics covered in its companion course PHY2048. Students will create experiment reports using analysis in calculus.

General Physics with Calculus II

PHY2049 General Physics with Calculus II
Credit Hours: 4

PHY2049 is part two of a comprehensive physics course outlining electricity, magnetism and optics using analysis in calculus.

General Physics with Calculus II Laboratory

PHY2049L General Physics with Calculus II Laboratory
Credit Hours: 1

A series of physics laboratory experiments chosen to coincide with the lecture course PHY2049. The course will include topics in electricity, magnetism, and optics. One 2-hour class meeting per week. A laboratory fee is charged.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION TRACK

Principles of Accounting

ACG2001 Principles of Accounting I
Credit Hours: 3

This course provides an introductory study of the fundamental principles of recording, summarizing and reporting the financial activities of proprietorships.

Principles of Accounting II

ACG2011 Principles of Accounting II
Credit Hours: 3

As the second course of the financial accounting series, this course concludes the study of financial accounting. Topics covered include plant assets, current liabilities, payroll, corporations, partnerships, and cash flow statements.

Managerial Accounting

ACG2071 Managerial Accounting
Credit Hours: 3

As the last course of the series, this course concludes the study of manufacturing accounting and managerial accounting. Topics covered include financial statement analysis, job order costing, the process cost system, cost behavior, cost-volume-profit analysis, budgeting, profit analysis, responsibility accounting, differential analysis, capital investment analysis and decision-making under uncertainty.

Computer & Internet Literacy

CGS1060C Computer & Internet Literacy
Credit Hours: 3

This is an introductory course in basic computer and internet use. It covers computer hardware and software fundamentals (including the use of Windows), key productivity applications (including word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation systems), and living in an online world (including network fundamentals, e-mails, and the effective use of the Internet as a communication tool and information resource). Students will develop basic computer skills to aid them with college studies and workforce readiness. Hands-on use of a personal computer is required.

Principles of Macroeconomics

ECO2013 Principles of Macroeconomics
Credit Hours: 3

An introductory course in macroeconomic principles covering basic economic problems and concepts. Topics discussed and analyzed include basic economic problems of unemployment and inflation, as well as fiscal and monetary policies. Students will recognize the role of households, businesses and governments in the market economy and in their own lives. This is a writing credit course with International/Intercultural content. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

Principles of Microeconomics

ECO2023 Principles of Microeconomics
Credit Hours: 3

An introductory course stressing microeconomic theories. Topics studied include the theory and application of supply and demand elasticity; theory of consumer demand, utility; production and cost theory including law of diminishing returns; the firm’s profit-maximizing behaviors under market models ranging from pure competition to pure monopoly; the theory of income distribution; comparative advantage, trade policies exchange rates, balance of payments, and other international issues.

Introduction to Business

GEB1011 Introduction to Business
Credit Hours: 3

This course provides a basic study of business activity and how it relates to our economic society. Topics covered include how businesses are owned, organized, managed and controlled. Course content emphasizes business vocabulary, areas of business specialization, and career opportunities.

Business Ethics

GEB2430 Business Ethics
Credit Hours: 1

A brief practical approach to recognizing, understanding and solving ethical problems confronting today’s business people and organizations. Students will review the historical development of ethics, examine a variety of ethical dilemmas, and will practice resolving them through ethical reasoning. Reference to statutory and professional codes will be addressed. Logical and responsible decision-making will be stressed with individual, organizational and societal needs being addressed.

Calculus for Business, Social and Life Sciences

MAC2233 Calculus for Business, Social & Life Sciences
Credit Hours: 3

This is a general education course which includes the college-level skills of calculus such as: functions, graphs, limits, differentiation, integration, average and instantaneous rates of change, and other applications. Recommendation from the Mathematics Department or at least a grade of a “C” in the prerequisite coursework required.

Introduction to Management

MAN2021 Introduction to Management
Credit Hours: 3

This course covers fundamental management principles and concepts. Emphasis is placed on the management functions of planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling. Principles of scientific management, motivation, and economic analysis are studied relative to their use in business decisions.

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